Vishful thinking…

Digging a little deeper into Google Fusion Tables – A technical GIS perspective

Posted in GIS by viswaug on February 14, 2011

Before I start getting into too much details about Google Fusion Tables, I will provide a link out to Google Fusion Tables. If you haven’t heard/played around with it yet, i would strongly encourage that you take a little time to do so. It will definitely not disappoint you and is definitely worth the time. It is still in ‘Beta’, but it is looking good.

The ‘Map’ and the ‘Intensity Map’ visualization of the table data should be of special interest to all the GIS folks. It makes the process of mapping data real easy. The ‘Location’ field type in Fusion Tables supports both street address strings and KML string representation of geometries. The street addresses entered into the location field get automatically geocoded and are viewable on the map visualization.

  • Even though the documentation doesn’t explicitly state it, the Location field supports the ‘MultiGeometry‘ representation in it’s Location field alongside the Point, LineString and the Polygon representations
  • This might be pretty obvious, but it supports only the WGS 84 Geographic coordinate system just like KML.

The map visualization also currently simple thematic rendering of maps based on certain column values. Some of the documentation on how to acheive it and available options are not very easy to find. So, I thought a link to the documentation might help later. The list of the available map markers are here. There are also a very good collection of publicly available data on Fusion Tables also. Check out the USA State and County boundaries here. There is also a wealth of other information out there already on Fusion Tables that are publicly available and can be easily location with a simple search. You can also upload ‘.csv’, ‘.kml’, spreadsheet files to Fusion Tables. The ‘ShpEscape‘ site also allows us to upload ‘.shp’ files to Fusion Tables. Once uploaded, data can simply be shared via an URL rather than emailing ‘.shp’ files around as attachments. Government agencies are also taking to Fusion Tables. Check out data from USDA NRCS, State of California and Natural Earth Vector data. I am hoping that the list gets bigger. Apart from just sharing data, it allows us to easily apply different chart visualizations to the data to glean useful trends and analytics for better informed decision making. Pretty powerful tools to unleash the power of data.

Fusion Tables also allows us to merge/join two tables in Fusion Tables based on a shared key. Fusion Tables also allows us to create views from base tables where only a filtered list of rows or columns are visible.

The views feature in Fusion Tables enables us to set user permissions based on columns and rows. To accomplish this, keep the base table private and create views that display only a filtered set of rows or columns. Now, the views alone can be shared with users. Users get access to different views as per their permission set.

The Google Fusion Tables also provides a simple and powerful API over HTTP to administer and manage your data in Fusion Tables. Public tables can be easily managed via simple HTTP requests to Fusion Tables identifying the table. Private tables can also be managed pretty easily using OAuth authenticated requests. The API does have some missing features also. The major one being that Fusion Tables does not support ‘OR’ queries. This missing functionality arises from the fact that Fusion Tables is built on top of Google’s DataStore.

  • Views cannot be created from Merged tables, but only from base tables
  • The resulting data from querying data from Fusion Tables is a comma delimited list of field values. Text column values are not normally not inside quotes unless they contain commas as a part of their field value. The Location field values are returned as KML string representations and they can contain commas in them. So, beware of this return format which throws a monkey wrench into the code needed for splitting the field values from the Fusion Tables response.

Google maps api v3 also supports displaying Fusion Tables data as overlays. The maps api pop-up bubble can be customized via Fusion Tables using any built-in templates or by providing custom HTML templates. The data being displayed on the map can also be filtered by providing a query string.

  • Note that the Fusion Tables query used in the maps api does not like queries of the type ‘Select * FROM’. It doesn’t like the ‘*’ and requires a column name to be specified
  • All Fusion Tables layers on the map get drawn on the map as a single overlay. That is, even if you have 10 Fusion Tables layers added to your google map, the api does not make ‘n’ tile requests for the 10 layers individually making the number of images being requested n*10, but the api only request ‘n’ tiles for all the Fusion Tables layers. This is just like how KML layers are handled in the maps api.

Fusion Tables does cluster your data into points on the map automatically at high scale levels. There are also some data serialization limits built-in to the Fusion Tables API. There is currently no way to display private Fusion Tables data overlayed in the google maps api v3. But that feature is supposed to be coming for google maps premier customer. I have submitted a list of Feature Requests (see below) with the Fusion Tables team, please star them if you would like to see them also.

That said, Fusion Tables is teh awesome.

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5 Responses

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  1. Wendy said, on May 5, 2011 at 11:34 pm

    I’m helping my sister with a project…she needs to incorporate street views. Any ideas? I have NO idea what I’m doing…other than researching incorporating street views in Google Fusion. I’ll pass any info or requests for clarification on to her…she’s a geography bachelors graduate taking an advanced remote sensing course.

    Thanks for ANY help!!

    Wendy

  2. […] Digging a little deeper into Google Fusion Tables – A technical GIS perspective […]

  3. […] Tables involves formation with a Google Maps JavaScript API v3 to daydream geocoded data. In “Digging a small deeper into Google Fusion Tables – A technical GIS perspective,” program developer Viswaug […]

  4. abcd said, on October 7, 2011 at 8:45 pm

    What if is the data is constantly changing?

    Plus we had tried to convert KML/KMZ to fusion tables (both their own data formats). It wasn’t be able to convert them.

  5. siri said, on May 15, 2012 at 1:26 am

    I need ‘labels’ to be displayed for every point – unlike pop-up bubble. how do i do it.. please help


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